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#1 17-05-2018 04:40:05

dmt1997325
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Cook and William

If you are interested in horses and ponies and are home for the summer Harrison Butker Jersey , you should think about attending a horse-related summer camp.

Most people who do go there to start looking during the winter or spring months so they know which one to attend. Summer camps go on throughout the entire summer and have several different dates and you can choose which one fits your summer schedule best.
A lot of local farms also offer weekly camping that you can go to each day.

Now is the right time for you to talk to your parents about going to a horsey summer camp. Sit down with your parents and talk about the following:

1.How long is the it? Is it day-to-day or do you have to stay for several weeks at a time? Do some research and see how long you would like to stay. A week long summer camp might be long enough.

2.How far away is the it? Look around and maybe find a farm or camp that is close enough to your house so your parents can take you back and forth.

3.How much is the it? Think about how much is per day or for the entire week?

Once you sat down and talked with your parents about attending a summer camp, you can start looking for the right one. If you live in an area where there are horse farms around, go to a few of the farms and ask if they are offering summer camps to the local children. You could also look in magazines or online to find out where the summer camps are located in your area.

If you want to go to a local summer camp, take a ride to your local tack store. They might have a bulletin board where the farms and camps post their ads and more information about what they have to offer. You can also ask some of the people who work at the tack store if they know if any farms or places in the area that are offering summer camps.

If you didn’t find any at the local tack store, log onto the computer and search the web for some camps. You can go to Google and search local riding camps in your area. When you find a few that you are interested in, write down the name of the camp or farm as well as their number and show it to your parents so they can check them out as well.

If you still are undecided about which camp to go to, ask some of your friends about what camps they go to. Ask them what they like best about the camp and what they recommend. It is always good to get advice and information from other kids or riders who have attended the same camp. They can give you the scoop on the facility, the other people there and the activities they do during the day.

Now that you have done some research on a few camps, it will be a good idea to go and check out each one. Don’t get your hopes set on one of them because they may only have a limited amount of space and it could fill quickly. If you are not able to go out and look at the camps in person, there should be a way of getting in touch with the camp director. Look on the camp website for their email or phone number so you can ask them questions about what they have to offer. Here are a few questions you should ask:

1.What type of riding to they offer at the camp? Do they offer English or Western?

2.Do they offer any other types of activities involving horses? Grooming, the care of them, etc?

3.How long is the summer camp? Weekly, day-to-day?

4.What kind of horses do they have at summer camp? Ponies, Horses or Both?

5.What other types of activities to they have at camp? Is it just strictly horses or are there other activities such as swimming or arts and crafts?

6.How much is the summer camp?

Once you have looked at the different camps, talked to others about the camps, it is time to decide which one to attend. Once you have found the right one, your parents will have to fill out some paper work and make a payment to reserve your spot at camp.

Make sure you have made a list of all the things you will need to take with you to summer camp, whether it’s a day-to-day summer camp or a week long. You want to make sure you have everything you need before you pack your bags and walk out the door.


The London 2012 Olympic Games introduced equestrianism to a wide new audience, as the British competitors showed the world how it's done. Great Britain was the most successful nation in the equestrian events, with three gold medals, a silver and a bronze. Pretty impressive considering there were 200 athletes from 40 different countries in the competition!

In the individual dressage event, Team GB managed to take home two medals. Charlotte Dujardin was awarded gold with her horse Valegro, while Laura Bechtolsheimer won bronze with Minstral Hojris.

Laura and Charlotte added more medals to their collection in the team dressage competition. Together with Carl Hester, whose horse was named Uthopia, they took home the gold medal beating Germany and the Netherlands into second and third place respectively.

In the team eventing competition, the British public spotted a familiar face in Zara Phillips, daughter of Princess Anne and wife of England rugby player Mike Tindall. Zara was joined by Nicola Wilson, Mary King, Kristina Cook and William Fox-Pitt to achieve a silver medal.

Proving that the British horse riders are great at working as a team, their third gold medal was for team jumping. Scott Brash, Peter Charles, Ben Maher and Nick Skelton were the winners after a jump-off (the riding equivalent of a penalty shoot out) between Team GB and the Netherlands.

The British <"http:www.robinsonsequestrian">Equestrian team made a great contribution to Team GB's medal tally and will now be considered heroes within the sport. Along with the rest of the equestrian world, they . Jerseys For Cheap   Jerseys China   Jerseys China   Jerseys China   Jerseys Cheap   Jerseys From China   Jerseys Free Shipping   Jerseys Free Shipping   NBA Jerseys Cheap   New MLB Jerseys Cheap

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